immigration detention

Limiting the Time Limit for Immigration Detention: The Danger of the ‘Foreign National Offender’ Exemption

Limiting the Time Limit for Immigration Detention: The Danger of the ‘Foreign National Offender’ Exemption

If a time limit for immigration detention is implemented, excluding people with previous convictions, then that time limit is fundamentally unfair and sets a dangerous precedent.

Home Office restricting asylum seekers from studying in the UK

Home Office restricting asylum seekers from studying in the UK

The study restriction saga is a prime example of the effects of the UK government’s ‘hostile environment’ policy. It shows how statutory powers, granted for a specific and restricted purpose, can take on a life of their own in the hands of a government which has vowed to make life difficult for those without legal status in the UK, blind to the consequences for asylum seekers and vulnerable individuals.

Mishka: The Shaw Review 2 is finally here, let’s use this opportunity for immigration detention reform.

Mishka: The Shaw Review 2 is finally here, let’s use this opportunity for immigration detention reform.

Effective detention campaigning is not merely about sentimental hashtags. We must continue to follow solution-based advocacy, with meaningful policy proposals aimed at the changes we expect from the government.

72 hours too many: how pregnant women are let down in immigration detention

72 hours too many: how pregnant women are let down in immigration detention

Two years ago on 12 July, a time limit of 72 hours was placed on how long a pregnant woman could be detained under immigration powers in the UK. This is 72 hours too many.

The Harm of Detention

The Harm of Detention

The deprivation of liberty, for the purpose of administration, harms people. The current process risks ignoring the different ways an individual can become vulnerable due to the harm of detention by relying solely on screening for pre-existing vulnerabilities.

A lack of accountability will always be the biggest problem when it comes to the Home Office’s behaviour

A lack of accountability will always be the biggest problem when it comes to the Home Office’s behaviour

Death, suicide, self-harm – all of these are part of the DNA of detention; they have become normalised. Where else in our society would we consider death, suicide, and self-harm as completely acceptable outcomes of a working governmental institution?